Florida also has a few “unique” rules and regulations that all patients should be aware of before buying, possessing, or using medical cannabis in the state. Here are some of the most common FAQ with regard to medical weed in Florida:

My Florida Medical Marijuana Card has Expired. How Do I Get a Renewal?

To maintain an active Compassionate Use Registry identification card, a patient (or their legal representative) must annually submit a renewal application, along with the application fee and any required accompanying documents to the department forty-five (45) days prior to the card expiration date.

Once I have my Florida MMJ card, where can I buy marijuana?

Once your application is approved and you receive your legal marijuana card, you or your legal caretaker will be able to buy cannabis products from a licensed medical marijuana treatment centers (MMTC) in the state of Florida.

Once I have my MMJ card, can I grow my own marijuana?

No. Florida law only allows the licensed dispensing organizations to grow, process and dispense marijuana. The department will refer any business or individual suspected of violating state law to local law enforcement for investigation. It is important to remember that marijuana is illegal under federal law.

 

hat are the Qualifying Conditions for Medical Marijuana in Florida?

Patients in Florida that have been diagnosed with one of the following “debilitating medical conditions” are afforded legal protection under the Florida Medical Marijuana Legalization Initiative (as per Amendment 2):

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS / Lou Gehrig’s disease)
    Cancer
    Crohn’s disease
    Epilepsy
    Glaucoma
    HIV / AIDS
    Seizures
    Chronic muscle spasms
    Multiple sclerosis
    Parkinson’s disease
    Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
    Any ailment/condition “of the same severity/symptoms” (as determined by the recommending physician)

 

One of the biggest benefits that marijuana has is a Decrease the symptoms of Dravet’s Syndrome
Dravet Syndrome causes seizures and severe developmental delays. Dr. Sanjay Gupta, renowned chief medical correspondent for CNN, is treating a five years old girl, Charlotte Figi, who has Dravet’s Syndrome, with medical marijuana strain high in cannabidiol and low in THC.
During the research for his documentary “WEED”, Gupta interviewed the Figi family, and according to the film, the drug decreased her seizures from 300 a week to just one every seven days. Forty other children are using the same medication, and it has helped them too.
The doctors who are recommending this medication say that the cannabidiol in the plant interacts with the brain cells to quiet the excessive activities in the brain that causes the seizures.